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new orleans newspaper archives

In MayAdvance Local announced it was cutting back publication of The Times-Picayune from seven days a week to three, making New Orleans the largest American city at that time without a daily newspaper. The baked alaska broke the news: The two papers were now one, bringing an end to an extraordinary modern newspaper war.

On the day last month when Pulitzer Prize winners were announced, The Advocate put up a paywall for the first time, limiting the number of articles nonsubscribers can read free online.

I asked whether the Sunday issue of the Times-Picayune will be packed with remembrances of its year history.

New orleans newspaper archives

In some instances, the Advocate was offering 25 to 40 percent less, Morris said. Rallies were held, T-shirts were made, and mocking Mardi Gras floats were paraded. Of the 65 or so Times-Picayune news staffers, editor Mark Lorando told me, only two, to date, have found work at other Advance properties — a columnist at Cleveland. The Advocate had offered to interview anyone from the Times-Picayune interested in working in the combined operations, but some chose not to. New Orleans thus became the latest American city to be left with fewer reporters covering its affairs, as local newspapers across the country — through mergers, buyouts, layoffs, whatever it takes — try to survive. It also kicked off an unusually vigorous stretch of journalism. The event that would set off the New Orleans newspaper war took place seven years ago to the month. He was also, at dinners and in stadium skyboxes, courting the local publishers of The Advocate, the longtime newspaper in Baton Rouge, which began printing a daily New Orleans edition after The Times-Picayune retrenched. The win was the crowning moment for The Advocate since it stormed into New Orleans journalism about six years ago. Employees who were let go from the Picayune were quickly picked up by The Advocate. What The Advocate had bought, for an undisclosed amount, was the brand, the site, the archives, the subscriber list — not the employees. CreditEdmund D. Within hours, the staff of The Times-Picayune, or nola. The newspaper is being folded into its rival, The Advocate. Pay was an issue, columnist Tim Morris wrote in a Facebook exchange with Georges.

New Orleans thus became the latest American city to be left with fewer reporters covering its affairs, as local newspapers across the country — through mergers, buyouts, layoffs, whatever it takes — try to survive.

In response, Advance Local has rolled out an aggressive digital strategy for the roughly two dozen newspapers it operates around the country, including papers in New JerseyAlabama and Michigan.

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With the end of a six-year battle and one big paper left in town, the journalists of New Orleans now turn to the real newspaper war: surviving in the news industry at all. The paper and the website were now theirs.

que pasa newspaper new orleans

Employees who were let go from the Picayune were quickly picked up by The Advocate. But as the newspaper war escalated, so did the journalism. Shea, the publisher of The Advocate, knew the city could not support two newspapers forever.

In a city that loves to read about itself, that decision about a paper that had been one of the very few local institutions to shine after Hurricane Katrina kicked up a storm of citywide outrage.

The times-picayune new orleans, la

The Advocate had offered to interview anyone from the Times-Picayune interested in working in the combined operations, but some chose not to. Shortly after 2 p. On the day last month when Pulitzer Prize winners were announced, The Advocate put up a paywall for the first time, limiting the number of articles nonsubscribers can read free online. It was May 2, not May 9. The paper and the website were now theirs. It also kicked off an unusually vigorous stretch of journalism. The deal did not include any real estate. New Orleans thus became the latest American city to be left with fewer reporters covering its affairs, as local newspapers across the country — through mergers, buyouts, layoffs, whatever it takes — try to survive. It takes no time at all to pick up the bitterness among some of the laid-off Times-Picayune employees who have landed at The Advocate, and still feel that they were unceremoniously kicked aside. The Newhouses were not going to change their plans, and were not going to sell the paper to someone who would.

Never exactly a showpiece, the building became a graffiti-covered eyesore with broken out windows.

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In New Orleans, two rival newspaper organizations become one this weekend